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Archive for June 27th, 2009

If you’ve been reading here any length of time, you know that the Mox family enjoys the beach.  We like the beach for many reasons.  If you’re us and you’re at the beach, it’s warm.  We like warm.  We also like sunny and breezy.  We like the opportunities we get to see some nature.  We like to build sand sculptures, too. 

It was with this in mind that my husband and I set about building a sandbox for Spawn in our back yard.  Previous sandboxes were more like sand piles, just a bit of river sand dumped strategically at the foot of the playset climbing tower.  Spawn pretty well dug to China in that stuff, mixing it with the dirt underneath to the point that it was no longer a sandpile but a mudhole. 

As a mom and the person who does the laundry around here, I am not in favor of mudholes. 

When spring rolled around, we looked at the sad, sorry state of the sandpile and decided to really do it up right this year.  My husband trenched out about six inches of dirt, lined it with landscape fabric, and rimmed it with edging.  All it needed was sand. 

We searched for a while for play sand, but the play sand we found was pretty much river sand, just bagged up and pricey.  And then we found it:  white sand. 

White sand like you find on the beaches of the Gulf of Mexico. 

Though it was considerably pricier than the regular play sand, we bought enough of it to fill the sandbox, and voila — Spawn had a personal beach. 

It’s been a great hit.  Except I forgot one thing about white sand.  White sand is so finely grained that it sticks to any and everything, and you can’t just dust it off like regular river sand.  Which means you track it in on your feet and it clings to your clothes, and it’s hard to get swept up. 

The floors in my house are now slightly gritty, as are the sheets on Spawn’s bed.  I find white footprints on my green carpet, and could probably exfoliate with the sand that finds its’ way onto my legs each night. 

A little bit of the beach brought home. 

 

— Mox

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